Pour-over Coffee Making with Hario

My family, my fiancée, and her family went together this past Christmas and got me coffee related gifts. Everything from fresh, small-batch coffee from Pour Richard’s Coffee Co. in Devon, PA to a pour-over coffee maker by Hario.

I watched a number of videos on how to make coffee using a pour-over coffee maker. It seems rather simple. But, I the devil is in the details along with a much better cup of coffee. I recommend watching a view videos and then trying it out.

Here are some notes that might help you get to a better cup of coffee quicker:

  • Choose a ceramic pour-over coffee brewer
  • Use a burr coffee grinder
  • Use fresh roasted coffee if you can
  • Use a gooseneck water pot to control the water pouring over the coffee grounds
  • Use a little water to heat up the brewer and cup before starting the brewing – this helps keep the coffee hot throughout the process
  • When you start the pour-over brewing process, pour water over and allow the coffee to bloom – you will see a “foam” of bubbling up from the grounds – stop pouring water and let it foam up a bit – the fresher the coffee the more bloom you will see
  • Have fun trying things out

I am still learning and want to keep taking this further. The one thing I keep seeing people doing is weighing everything out on a scale – including the water. As I experiment more, I might have to try that so I can control the quality, but in general I have been making some very good, full-flavor cups of coffee without precise measurement.

Making the Perfect Cup of Coffee

The only reason to make the perfect cup of coffee is to enjoy the perfect cup of coffee. My life is filled with moments connected to coffee. Nothing was better than being in New Orleans and having a coffee at Cafe Du Monde. Or blitz chess at Seatle’s Best (while they were the best). And performing at a coffee shop on an Open Mic night with bad poets, mediocre musicians, and wannabe comedians.

These sentiments might not mean much to a to a person that doesn’t drink coffee (or tea), but I am sure you can find a parallel substance in your life. I am not talking about drinking coffee for the sake of drinking coffee, not the times you need it to wake up, but rather the experience of coffee. When you couple a perfect moment with the perfect cup, you create a truly great experience.

“It was a pleasant cafe, warm and clean and friendly, and I hung up my old water-proof on the coat rack to dry and put my worn and weathered felt hat on the rack above the bench and ordered a cafe au lait. The waiter brought it and I took out a notebook from the pocket of the coat and a pencil and started to write.” – Ernest Hemingway

I would rather have a brewed coffee or espresso vs. a latte or cappuccino. Certain large scaled coffee vendors have serialized the coffee drink to the point to where coffee is second to sugar. A Cafe Americano (espresso plus hot water) is about the best value (but I noticed Starbucks raises the price $.35 every quarter). I am not a purist but I am in it for the coffee taste. I am so much not a purist that sometimes I say “Expresso” when I am in the company of those who take it too far. I like to miss use words and see the retractions, most just simply ignore me.

What are the ingredients of the perfect cup of coffee? I am going to conclude that the situation is just as significant as the actual cup of coffee. Take away the experience and it probably would taste like it tastes from a truck stop in North Dakota. When I am home I meticulously attempt to make the perfect cup of coffee using apparatuses from all over the world.

Here is my approach to the pursuit of the perfect cup:

  • Invite a friend (or better yet have the friend make you coffee)
  • Have a notebook handy for those best ideas
  • Mute the mobile
  • Grind a whole bean roast (French is one of the best coffee tastes)
  • Use a fine grind for the Aeropress
  • Use a course grind for the French Press
  • Use medium for the drip
  • Use filtered filtered water and ceramic mugs
  • Boil the water and then let it cool off for 2 minutes
  • Use a little of the hot water to warm up the carafe and cups
  • Brew in your preferred fashion (I prefer the Aeropress for dark roasts and the French press for lighter roasts)
  • Don’t over do the steeping – bitterness is what most people don’t enjoy (bitterness is caused by over heating and over brewing)
  • Pour into mugs
  • Add warm milk if necessary (a Cafe Au Lait is equal parts coffee and warmed milk)
  • Create your moment and enjoy

It’s a lot of work that needs continual attention and improvement. A lot can go wrong, but the overwhelming ingredient is timing.